Sunday, November 20, 2005

False Memory: Are Recovered Memories of Past Events Accurate?

Abstract
The effects of suggestibility (misled vs. non-misled) and source monitoring (yes-no vs. source recall test) and source modality (picture vs. text vs. both picture and no text vs. neither picture or text) on memory were examined. 16- to 25-year-old college students (N = 48) saw a color slide and read either a misleading or non-misleading narrative about the picture. Participants recalled details of the picture by source (source-recall), or recalled details of the picture with no reference to the source (yes-no). Participants in the yes-no recall condition had better memory scores compared to those in the source-recall condition. Misleading narrative did not influence recall of items either from picture or text. Results are discussed in view of the false memory debate.


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2 comments:

Dr. Deborah Serani said...

I think the false memory issue is one that is skewed by age. The ones done with children are amazing!

~Deb

astrorat said...

Dear Dr. D,

Rightly said... the ones done with children are awesome! my university has 2 researchers working with child eye witness testimony. I was an RA with one of them! :) it certainly is pretty complicated research!